Tell Me When It Hurts: Judicial Violence in Medieval Europe

April 27th, 2013

The Middle Ages span from the seventh to the fifteenth century and remains infamous as one of the most exciting and bloodthirsty periods in European history. Stories of torture and executions have peppered this time and flavored it with a reputation for the barbaric. Read More…

Elizabeth Stanley as Lord of Man

April 14th, 2012

Elizabeth Stanley, Countess of Derby, was the ruler of the Isle of Man from c.1612 to 1627, a tiny island in the Irish Sea that in the Medieval period was the seat of a powerful maritime kingdom ruled by Norse kings. By the Early Modern period the island was considered part of the wider British Isles but it was not part of the realm of England; rather, it was a dependent of the English crown with its own separate government exempt from acts of Parliament. Read More…

Examining Musical Borrowing in an Era of Sophistication, Transition, and Turbulence: Johannes Ciconia’s Sus Une Fontayne

April 29th, 2008

Musical borrowing: the intentional integration of previously-composed material into a new composition. Such borrowing has been an integral facet of music composition throughout music history, and was particularly important during the Medieval and Renaissance eras. Read More…

The Medieval Warm Period: How Climate Change Shaped European History

April 29th, 2008

When discussing the issues surrounding current global warming, is not uncommon to hear people bring up the so-called “Medieval Warm Period.” Such conversations are littered with debates about what the Medieval Warm Period actually was, how it impacted the world of the Middle Ages, and what an accurate comprehension of it could mean for our future. Read More…

The Saint and the Sinner: The Ideology of Jean, duc de Berry as Understood by the Limbourg Brothers

April 29th, 2008

The work of the early fifteenth-century artists collectively called “the Limbourg Brothers” is neither unknown to scholars of medieval history nor fully understood by them. Read More…

Self-inflicted Freedoms: Elisabetta Sirani and the Image of the Empowered Woman

April 29th, 2008

The image of the female heroine in early modern art is one that varies greatly depending upon the artist portraying her. However, some of these works move beyond simple variation and into the exception. Read More…

Despoiling the Flower: The Evolving Face of the Villain in Medieval Chivalry

April 29th, 2006

In an adventure formula, conflict with the villain is essential for moving the story along and provides wit, suspense, as well as illustrating what should not be done. Read More…

Dramatizing Domestic Violence in Early Modern England

April 12th, 2003

The nature of domestic violence in the early modern period was of vital importance not only to individuals but also to social units of various complexities. What was happening in homes commanded the attention of ecclesiastical authorities who wrote numerous conduct books on the grounds and acceptable limits of spousal abuse. Read More…

Albrecht Dürer, Masculinity, and the Choice of Hercules

April 13th, 2002

During the European Renaissance, a culture of manliness formed around the ideals of action, reason, and contemplation. These ideals are epitomized in the Master Works of Albrecht Dürer: Knight, Death and the Devil, St. Jerome in his Study, and Melancholia I. Read More…

Nudity and Chastity: Jan Van Hemessen’s Judith

April 13th, 2002

Jan Sanders Van Hemessen presents a muscular, nude figure wielding a sword as the chaste widow of Judith with the Head of Holofernes of 1540. Read More…

History and Memory in Medieval and Renaissance Florentine Chronicles

April 1st, 2000

The development of historical writing from the late Medieval period to the early Renaissance reveals changes in the purpose of historical memory. Read More…