A Statistical Investigation of Student Retention Rate at Cornell

April 27th, 2013

The 2011-2012 Cornell Fact Book states that in 2011, the first-year retention rate was 79%. That is, 79% of the entering cohort in 2010 remained at Cornell for their second year. Read More…

Game Against the Proportionality: An Economic Approach to Explaining the Resistance Behind Proportional Electoral Voting

April 27th, 2013

This study looks at the economic disincentive for states to switch to the proportional electoral voting system. Every four years during the presidential campaign, both campaigns spend a considerable amount of money in the battleground states. Switching from “winner takes all” voting system to “proportionality voting” will lead to economic consequences. Read More…

Wormholes and Really Weird Space: Higher Mathematics in Action

April 14th, 2012

We normally think of space as more or less Euclidean.  Straight lines are infinite; they cross maybe once, if that.  Mathematicians spent almost 2000 years trying to prove that this is the only kind of space that can possibly exist.  Instead they eventually found that there are non-Euclidean spaces that are logically, perfectly consistent. Read More…

Weighted Wet Foams

April 14th, 2012

A dry foam consists of thin liquid walls separating gas cells, such as in soap suds. A foam is called wet when the liquid pools at the intersections of cell walls. It is well understood how to “decorate” the intersection of a weightless dry foam to produce a weightless wet foam in its equilibrium state. Read More…

A Mathematical Yarn – With a Twist

April 14th, 2012

The art of crocheting can produce a stunning variety of aesthetically pleasing objects from the same skein of yarn.  Some of them defy our intuition. Take, for example, the Klein bottle, a surface which like a sphere, has no edges or rims, but unlike a sphere does not have an inside and an outside—it has just one side! Read More…

Curve Reconstruction From Three Dimensional Point Clouds

April 5th, 2011

If you had a collection of dots that looked like they all surrounded a line, how would you find the line? What if you suspected they came from a circle, an arch or a general curve, and what if they were in three dimensional space? Read More…

An Introduction to Fractional Calculus

April 7th, 2010

Fractional Calculus is the study of integrals and derivatives of arbitrary order. We are all at least acquainted with the idea of a regular derivative or integral, and, by iteration, second, third, and even arbitrary integer-order integrals or derivatives can be found with the tools of regular calculus. Read More…

Matrix Representations of Path Algebras

April 18th, 2009

Given a directed graph with a finite number of vertices and edges, a path algebra can be produced from the linear combinations of vertices and paths. Read More…

Terahertz Spectroscopy of CdSe Quantum Dots

April 18th, 2009

My project was on the terahertz spectroscopy of undoped, tin doped and indium doped CdSe Quantum dots. Read More…

Unfolding a Three Dimensional Sierpinski Gasket

April 29th, 2008

Many mathematicians and scientists have tried to visualize four dimensional space. I tried to visualize a four dimensional sierpinski pyramid and construct a three dimensional projection of the four dimensional pyramid. Read More…

Genetics and Statistics: My Internship at TGen

April 14th, 2007

Last October and November I completed an internship at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) in Phoenix, Arizona. The internship was created and supported by Dimensions, based on the ideas of Dr. Candice Nulsen (’ 94). Read More…

Predicting Dispersal of the Dogbane Beetle in a Fragmented Landscape

April 14th, 2007

This project is an extension of the research being done by our visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Fabián Candelaria. Its purpose was to take data previously collected about the dogbane beetle and create a computer program that could project the dispersal patterns of the beetle over its lifetime. Read More…

The Origin of Euler’s Gamma Function Research

April 14th, 2007

It is common knowledge in the mathematical community that Leonhard Euler discovered the Gamma Function between late 1729 and early 1730. What is unique about this result is that it is an extremely early example of what seems to be math for mathematics sake; the applications of the function were not discovered until much later. Read More…

Privacy Preserving Data Set Union

April 14th, 2007

This program is an implementation of an algorithm designed by Segre et.al. [1]. It follows a protocol intended to combine two datasets by their confidential identifiers, removing all the duplicate records without revealing the identifiers. Read More…

Foucault Pendulum

April 29th, 2006

The Foucault Pendulum is arguably one of the most beautiful demonstrations in physics. As the pendulum swings, the earth rotates underneath. Read More…

Quantitative Analysis of Wing Pattern: A Tool for Distinguishing Among Cryptic Sympatric Species

April 29th, 2006

As part of an ongoing study of the evolution of Blepharoneura, a neotropical genus of highly host-specific tephritid fruit flies, we are discovering extraordinary levels of diversity. Read More…

Ruby Pulse Laser and Holograms

April 29th, 2006

The ruby laser is a pulse laser with a very short pulse (a few nanoseconds) allowing us to make holograms of less stationary objects. Read More…

Musical Temperament: An Explication of the Primary Tuning Systems of Western Music

April 29th, 2006

This lecture will provide a brief history of temperament, focusing upon the four most important temperament systems. Read More…

The Admissions Question: Who Will Come?

April 29th, 2006

The subject of this project is to predict variables that are significant in a student’ s enrollment choice. Read More…

An Introduction to Elliptic Curves

April 29th, 2006

Elliptic Curves come under a relatively nascent area of mathematics known as Algebraic Geometry. Read More…

A Robot Named V.I.C.I. – Vision-based Intelligent Color Interpreter

April 29th, 2006

This summer, I worked at the University of Florida learning how to design and construct robots. A robot is an autonomous machine that detects and responds to external stimuli in a way that simulates intelligent behaviors. Read More…

“God is My Ex-Lover…” and Other Interesting Findings Concerning Religious Life on the Cornell College Campus

April 17th, 2004

The transition from high school to college is a tumultuous journey filled with challenges and changes. During this time of transformation, will a student change something as personal and defining as religion? Read More…

“God is My Ex-Lover…” and Other Interesting Findings Concerning Religious Life on the Cornell College Campus

April 17th, 2004

The transition from high school to college is a tumultuous journey filled with challenges and changes. During this time of transformation, will a student change something as personal and defining as religion? Read More…

“God is My Ex-Lover…” and Other Interesting Findings Concerning Religious Life on the Cornell College Campus

April 17th, 2004

The transition from high school to college is a tumultuous journey filled with challenges and changes. During this time of transformation, will a student change something as personal and defining as religion? Read More…

Optimal Voting Strategies for “The Weakest Link”

April 12th, 2003

The television program “The Weakest Link,” is a game show with a winner-take-all format in which players vote to remove potential rivals following each round. Read More…

Chaos of an Oscillating Dip Needle in a Variant Magnetic Field

April 1st, 2000

Chaos theory, initially started in the 19th century by the French mathematician Henri Poincare and later realized by Lorenz, Feigenbaum and others, describes a system that is non-random and deterministic. Read More…

e^(2(pi)i)!=1^2, But What About n! in the Non-Trivial Case?

April 1st, 1997

Is n! ever a perfect square? The obvious solution is yes. That is when you consider 0! and 1!. But for n>1 the answer is no. I will show an easy proof of this using a result of number theory, Bertrand’s Postulate. Read More…